« Using Up My Tomato Yield | Main | Bonus Material: Buying Bees Through The Mail »

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Tim:
that's a great article with some excellent info!
-- Paul & Carol
(Vancouver, Canada)

Hi, I live in Brooklyn and love the out of doors, thus the Lyme disease I am suffering. I have read an awful lot about Apitherapy and was wondering if you know anyone that does this in the area? Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

You couldn't expect people to be growing their own farms in Brooklyn. Beekeeping is still new around town.

My neighbor wants to start beehives and we live on acre lots but i am severely allergic to all stinging insects. I carry an Epi-Pen when outside.I know the benefits agriculturally but will this increase my chances of getting stung because we both have many flower gardens as well as vegetable gardens. He states that he will place the crates at furthest point away from my house but i am still concerned about the possibility of increased risk of dying. Do you have any info on this matter?Thanks,Sue

Hi Sue, I can't give you a professional medical opinion on this, but I do have a gardener's opinion. If you already have a garden, then bees are already visiting your yard every day. Bees will travel for miles to pollinate plants, so even if their hives are not in your neighborhood, they're still pollinating your garden. So whether your neighbor has a hive or not, you are going to attract bees to your yard.

You could try asking your neighbor to point the entrance to the hive in the opposite direction of your house. This way, when the bees leave the hive, they are more likely to fly in a path away from your garden.

Thank you for your response I was just curious if you knew if this puts me at greater risk of stings but i understand your reluctance for a professional opinion on the medical aspect. That is a good idea about the direction of the hives in oppposite direction. Also i figured if i feel it is putting me at an increased risk he said he could always move them to work or a friends house. there will be about an acre and a half between my gardens and his hives. Thanks again.Sue

An observation hive is a small hive that the beeekeper uses to observe the bees. Sometimes they're large, but this one is small, designed to hold only a single frame from a hive. I used it a few times to give lectures at schools about bees. The kids loved watching the bees in action, and the frame even had two drones and an empty queen cell, neither of which many people ever have the privilege of seeing.

Welcome to Beekeeping. It appears we have sraettd within 2 weeksof each other, as well as, we both are starting with two hives.I see someone is wrapped up for the bee wars. Let's bounce off each other and monitor our hives progress.I'm in northern Alabama, the weather does make a difference.Brought my swarms up from 80 and humid to 50 s and wet.Was worried a bit if they'd hang in there.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.

Hi! My name is Martina and I have a "farm" in my New York City backyard called FarmTina.

My definition of "farm" is really just a living space that brings together home grown vegetables & fruits, animals, flowers & trees, and concoctions that use all of these ingredients together... read more